LEIGH FORBES: Books of all Sorts

4th November 2016
by Leigh Forbes
Comments Off on Plato and a Platypus Walk into a Bar: Understanding Philosophy Through Jokes

Plato and a Platypus Walk into a Bar: Understanding Philosophy Through Jokes

by Daniel Klein and Thomas Cathcart. With a heavy leaning towards Jewish and sexual jokes (many of which felt misogynistic and/or objectifying), this book wasn’t for me. Philosophy and humour is a great premise, and I love clever philosophical jokes, … Continue reading

15th May 2016
by Leigh Forbes
Comments Off on Is That a Fish in Your Ear? The Amazing Adventure of Translation

Is That a Fish in Your Ear? The Amazing Adventure of Translation

by David Bellos. An interesting book looking at a wide range of translation-related topics, from the meaning of words, language, and the meaning of meaning itself, to simultaneous translation and the use of gesticulation – introducing many aspects of translation … Continue reading

21st April 2016
by Leigh Forbes
Comments Off on The Etymologicon

The Etymologicon

by Mark Forsyth. A lighthearted sprint through the etymology of a linked selection of words. I say sprint, because the end of each (very short) chapter leads you immediately on to the next, and it’s hard to put down. I … Continue reading

18th April 2016
by Leigh Forbes
Comments Off on Off the Map: Lost Spaces, Invisible Cities, Forgotten Islands, Feral Places and What They Tell Us About the World

Off the Map: Lost Spaces, Invisible Cities, Forgotten Islands, Feral Places and What They Tell Us About the World

by Alastair Bonnett. The title and blurb are misleading: although this is a book about places, many of them truly fascinating, for the most part they are well known and well mapped (I used to drive past one of them every day). … Continue reading

2nd February 2016
by Leigh Forbes
Comments Off on The Edge of the World: How the North Sea Made Us Who We Are

The Edge of the World: How the North Sea Made Us Who We Are

by Michael Pye. Brilliantly researched, but poorly written. Michael Pye’s wonderful collection of fascinating historical knowledge is marred by the higgledy-piggledy way in which it is presented. There is a wealth of information about law, plague, fashion, vikings, and trade … Continue reading